Real Life

John Russell Houser shot 11 people in a theatre in Lafayette on July 23, 2015 during the film "Trainwreck." 

According to CNN, Houser was a recent law school graduate who suffered from mental illnesses. After the shootings, he then turned on himself and shot himself in the head.

This shooting has turned people's attention back to the fateful night of the Aurora, Colorado shooting three years ago, where shooter James Holmes opened fire, injuring hundreds of people.

Instances like these are causing people to deeply question gun reform in the United States and who should be allowed to get guns. 

Like Holmes, there is evidence to suggest Houser's attack was not a spontaneous act, but rather, a planned out one. Holmes left 12 dead; Houser left two dead and injured 11 people. 

While no official statement has been made, people wonder if the recent sentencing in the Holmes' case was merely a coincidence or a push for action.

 

 

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According to the Oxford English Dictionary, a hero is "A man (or occasionally a woman) of superhuman strength, courage, or ability, favoured by the gods; esp. one regarded as semi-divine and immortal. Also in extended use, denoting similar figures in non-classical myths or legends."

But that definition seems to have evolved. No longer is strength or courage a sign of being a hero. Today, it seems that for many people being a hero simply means doing the right thing.

On YouTube, there's a series called "What Would You Do?" with hundreds of thousands of views. The show presents scenarios in which people have the opportunity to do the right thing. Famous examples show teens bullying another teen who stutters, people being racist or people being downright mean.

In some of these situations, the people might have been heroes; however, in several cases, they were simply people doing the right thing.

Human decency didn’t used to be synonymous with heroism, but today that seems to be shifted.

A junior high teacher recently asked her eighth grade class if certain acts made somebody a hero. They were asked if being nice to somebody made them a hero. They all said yes. It was the same response when they were asked if telling the cops they had burnt down the town would be heroic.

While these can be considered heroic actions, it seems like they were merely doing the right thing.

When what used to be considered to be human decency shifts and changes to be considered heroic, I think we have to question the moral of society. Being a decent person isn’t “heroic” at least it shouldn’t be; it should be a person being a good person.

Being a hero should extend to more than showing basic human decency. Heroism should mean going above and beyond simply being a morally decent person.

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According to the National Coalition against Domestic Violence, nearly 20 people per minute are physically abused in the United States, meaning that this makes 10 million people a year.

Further statistics show that 1 in 3 women and 1 in 4 have been victims of physical violence by an intimate partner within their lifetime in the United States.

According to the British Crime Survey Statistical Bulletin, 1 in 4 women and 1 in 6 men will be the victims of domestic abuse in their lifetime.

Thirty percent of women in Italy are affected by domestic violence, and Italy’s femicide rates are catching attention worldwide, according to Forbes.

These statistics seem harsh — but that’s because the reality of domestic violence is brutal.

Domestic violence has always been one of the most difficult crimes to catch and to punish.

One partner who forced sex on his or her partner is often not considered rape or abuse. Rather it’s the partner taking what’s rightfully his or her.

Furthermore, oftentimes abused partners stay with the abuser because of fear of breaking apart their family.

Several women say things like “I didn’t want to divorce him until the kids were raised.”

However, this raises the issue of whether kids are better off being raised in a violent, abusive home or a single parent home.

On this topic, people seem to take several different sides.

The consensus seems to be that domestic violence in on the rise and so is domestic murder-suicide.

This begs the question of what can be done to help prevent further “femicide” due to domestic violence. 

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A room full of college students in Utah, United States sat in silence when asked if they knew the signs of human trafficking. 

Some of them had read a little bit online, but the overwhelming response was that most didn't know the signs.

But human trafficking doesn't happen in the United States, right? So why do we need to know the signs?

Actually, according to the National Human Trafficking Resource Center (NHTRC), there have been nearly 40,000 reported victims of human trafficking in the United States since 2007.

This year alone there have already been 1,345 reported cases of human trafficking and there is an estimate of more than 27 million slaves worldwide, according to the NHTRC. This means that there are more slaves today than any other time in history.

The United States is known as being one of the countries with the most people being trafficked. Sex and corruption follow money; this makes the United States a big culprit.

However, the United States isn’t the only country with problems. Countries in Europe, Africa and Asia are high culprits as well.

Experts say one of the first ways people can help with this issue is by knowing and recognizing the signs of human trafficking.

Common signs include people who are not free to leave and go as they wish, work excessively long hours, owes a large debt and can’t pay it off or live in houses that have unusually high security.

Experts say that it’s better to call in a false alarm than to not call at all.

More information on recognizing the signs of human trafficking can be found at the National Human Trafficking Resource Center.

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We were coming from a business trip. Two young women and I were on our way home after finishing a week long training session. It was awesome! Not the trip – I am talking about the training! A lots of hope, packed with a lot of worries, and a humongous plan for next two months to see the fruits of hard work in next few months. I was excited! I had reason to be excited. It was a resurrection for me in terms of my business life! And heartfelt thanks to a gentleman for making it happen! I also realized that ‘wisdom’ is a function of education, experience, and age when he made a decision approving my business deal by changing it! I truly realized what a good decision that was in next few months.   

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- Hey, are you White?

- Oh Lord! Why? Does it matter?

- Not really. Then again, if Santa comes in Black and White, I want to know about you as well. Capish? May be I want you to be Indian! Hee hee hee….

-hee hee hee…very funny! Do you want me to wear a lungi then?

-Why not? You eat Curry-Chicken, don’t you? May be you should be Indian looking Jesus!

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