Recent decisions by the American Bar Association have made it less strict for students to attend law school. Schools now have the option of allowing certain students to attend law school without taking the LSAT.

This change has many wondering if law schools aren't receiving the applicants they need, especially when they are making decisions in August to help more people.

According to an article by Bloomberg, law schools applications hit a 15-year low. 

Law schools have consistently received 6.7 percent fewer applicants than in 2014, according to the Law School Admisison Council. 

What does this mean for colleges across the country?

It means it's a great time to apply for law school especially with schools making so many accomodations, but this still leaves the concern if law school is still profitable.

Law admission offices seem to be answering with a resounding yes, but student apparently still have their doubts. 



Certain neurologists have now taken scans of the brain showing that obesity like drug addiction can shrink the brain.

In past years, brain scans have shown that drug addictions shrink the brain. Scientists are now showing that obesity behaves in similar ways.

Obesity seems to be a buzzword as people grow increasingly concerned over the rates of obese individuals in the world. According to the CDC, over one third of United States adults are obese.

Obesity leads to severe health problems, but now scientists claim it leads to a shrunken brain. What do you think? 


Several weeks ago the hashtag #tenthingsnottosaytoawriter began trending on Twitter, and is still going strong today.

This hashtag, started by an author who wanted to vent after hearing one too many comments from unthinking acquiantances, has grown to encompass all writers, "from celebrity authors to ghosting freelancers and everyone in between" (Sarah McCoy, August 25th), who have taken the opportunity to commiserate and comfort each other in the face of such ignorance from the world at large.

Aside from the numerous authors, freelancers and yes, hobbyists who use Twitter and therefore have had a chance to weigh in with their own opinions on the subject, the hashtag has caught the attention of several mainstream publications, including the Huffington Post and New Republic, all of whom have written articles with their own spin on the hashtag phenomenon.

While these articles and Tweets are mainly funny, they do bring up some interesting points: why is writing so undervalued?  Nobody would ever dream of dismissing a doctor or a lawyer as 'just a doctor', but for some reason, writers and authors aren't worthy of courtesy.

I believe there are many reasons for this, but one of the main ones is exposure.  A common theme among people who have only disparaging comments for writers is that they are lazy, don't do any work and say they are writers purely in order to get out of doing a real job, and this might be because writers aren't a common sight for most people.

Writing is generally a solitary process - writers spend their time in front of a stack of books (for research), a stack of notebooks (for notetaking or writing), or a computer (for all of the above), and while they may be in a library or a coffee shop rather than their own house, they are still wrapped up in their own small world where nobody else may walk unless invited.

Because of this, people may not realise what exactly writing is.  By this, I don't mean they don't understand how hard the work is (that is a topic for a different post), but that because, to paraphrase Locke, they don't see the writing process and how it is involved in day to day entertainment, and so they undervalue it.

Think about how much of our lives revolve around writing.  Writing is involved in books, TV programmes, movies, comics, video games, role-playing games, newspapers, magazines, leaflets, adverts, and so much more.  Yet, who gets credit for a movie?  The actors and the director.  Sometimes the writers are mentioned, but this is a rarity.  The writing effort which is involved in making the movie what it is is very often completely forgotten.

This means that people are very often not consciously aware of the impact which writing has on their lives - they don't watch a TV programme and gush about how well written the dialogue was - they talk about the costumes or the way a parrticular scene is shot. Writing is very often hidden away, almost as though it is shameful to let people see it.

This lack of knowledge about the part that writing plays in bringing people the entertainment they consume on a day to day basis is part of what leads people to assume that what writers do is not important or noteworthy, and so why we are told we should get a real job.


According to the Oxford English Dictionary, a hero is "A man (or occasionally a woman) of superhuman strength, courage, or ability, favoured by the gods; esp. one regarded as semi-divine and immortal. Also in extended use, denoting similar figures in non-classical myths or legends."

But that definition seems to have evolved. No longer is strength or courage a sign of being a hero. Today, it seems that for many people being a hero simply means doing the right thing.

On YouTube, there's a series called "What Would You Do?" with hundreds of thousands of views. The show presents scenarios in which people have the opportunity to do the right thing. Famous examples show teens bullying another teen who stutters, people being racist or people being downright mean.

In some of these situations, the people might have been heroes; however, in several cases, they were simply people doing the right thing.

Human decency didn’t used to be synonymous with heroism, but today that seems to be shifted.

A junior high teacher recently asked her eighth grade class if certain acts made somebody a hero. They were asked if being nice to somebody made them a hero. They all said yes. It was the same response when they were asked if telling the cops they had burnt down the town would be heroic.

While these can be considered heroic actions, it seems like they were merely doing the right thing.

When what used to be considered to be human decency shifts and changes to be considered heroic, I think we have to question the moral of society. Being a decent person isn’t “heroic” at least it shouldn’t be; it should be a person being a good person.

Being a hero should extend to more than showing basic human decency. Heroism should mean going above and beyond simply being a morally decent person.


Amnesty International has made a decision to support the legalization of prostitution. 

Needless to say this has certainly elicited a strong response and not a positive one for many people. 

Amnesty International claims to have made the decision to support the legalization to support the legalization of prostitution in an attempt to make working conditions better and increase rights for those involved in the trade.

However, critics are outraged claiming that all this does is increase the ease in which pimps can do their work. 

Newspapers and blogs across the country have responded to the decision with fiery remarks. 

The question remains to be seen as to what impact all of this will have. 


According to a Gallup Poll referenced in The Atalantic, 23% of Americans said they didn't read a book in the past year. This is up from the 8% who didn't read a book in 1978. However, the increase isn't as high as one might think. 

From 1990 to current day it's consistently stayed around the percentage of non-readers as hovered in the upper teens and lower twenties.

According to Quora, the average user reads about 15 books a year which breaks down to little over a book a month. People cite many reasons as to why people are no longer reading. Ideas range from people caliming it has to do with the culture of instant gratification. Others claim it is becaue people watch too much television.

Nobody has a consensus, but the reports show that Americans aren’t reading.

One business insider claimed that CEOs should read four to five books a month. The dichotomy from the average to the ideal CEO is drastic, but trends show that the nonreaders will continue. Newspapers are already suffering the consequences, and everybody has their eye on the book industry. The only question is what the longlasting consequences will be.